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European Journal of Gynaecological Oncology  2017, Vol. 38 Issue (5): 724-726    DOI: 10.12892/ejgo3615.2017
Original Research Previous articles | Next articles
Post-operative fever in open compared with robotic hysterectomies for endometrial cancer
R. Drenchko1, C. Chung1, K.J. Manahan1, J.P. Geisler1, *()
1 Cancer Treatment Centers of America, Division of Gynecologic Oncology, Newnan, GA, USA
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Abstract  
Objective: There are numerous explanations behind the presence of post-operative fever that patients may experience. The aim of this study was to determine if temperatures ≥ 38.0°C were more common in patients undergoing open or robotic surgery for endometrial cancer. Materials and Methods: 150 women were retrospectively analyzed; half underwent robotic hysterectomy and the other half underwent an open approach. A febrile episode was a single temperature of ≥ 38.3°C or a sustained temperature of ≥ 38.0°C for more than one hour. Temperatures were recorded and compared for 48 hours postoperatively. Results: Febrile episodes of 38.0-38.3°C were seen in 33.3% of patients undergoing an open approach and 12% of patients undergoing robotic surgery (p = 0.003) within two days of surgery. Temperatures of ≥ 38.3°C were only seen in three patients in the open arm and one in the robotic arm (4% vs. 1.3%, p = 0.3). Those few who experienced temperatures ≥ 38.3°C were all found to have infections. Conclusions: There is a significantly decreased incidence of a post-operative fever in a patient who undergoes a robotic hysterectomy instead of an open abdominal hysterectomy for the treatment of endometrial cancer.
Key words:  Robotic hysterectomy      Laparotomy      Fever     
Published:  10 October 2017     
*Corresponding Author(s):  J.P. GEISLER     E-mail:  Geisler.jp@gmail.com

Cite this article: 

R. Drenchko, C. Chung, K.J. Manahan, J.P. Geisler. Post-operative fever in open compared with robotic hysterectomies for endometrial cancer. European Journal of Gynaecological Oncology, 2017, 38(5): 724-726.

URL: 

https://ejgo.imrpress.com/EN/10.12892/ejgo3615.2017     OR     https://ejgo.imrpress.com/EN/Y2017/V38/I5/724

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